COMPUTER BUSINESS REVIEW

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Issue Date: March 2008

New technology rechargeable batteries

6 March 2008

Until recently, rechargeable batteries would lose their charge quicker than non-rechargeable batteries. This gave little incentive to purchase rechargeable batteries for low power consumption appliances, because they would lose their power in weeks rather than months.
Now, based on a new biodegradeable chemical technology, the Uniross Hybrio range of rechargeable batteries will lose only 20% of their charge in a year. This makes the Hybrio suitable for all types of appliances, while still ideally suited to high-power consumption devices such as digital and video cameras.
"The Hybrio batteries are sold fully charged. This enables them to be used immediately after purchase. And Hybrio batteries can be recharged up to 1000 times, providing a significant cost saving over disposable batteries," says Uniross marketing manager Michael Rogers.
Cost savings to the consumer are significant. For example, a pack of four AAA disposable batteries costs around R24. A basic rechargeable pack comprising a standard charger and four AAA rechargeable batteries costs around R125.
1000 X disposable batteries (@ R24 for four) R6000 Less four rechargeable batteries and a charger R125
Saving R5875
Rechargeable batteries also provide significant benefits in terms of the consumption of natural resources, global warming, ozone pollution, air acidification and water pollution.
Research conducted by Bio Intelligence Service in Germany shows that for 1 kWh of energy produced, rechargeable batteries have 23 times less potential impact on non-renewable natural resources.
This means that rechargeable batteries consume up to 23 times less non-renewable natural resources (fossil and mineral) than disposable batteries. To provide the same amount of energy, more disposable batteries are also needed than rechargeable batteries. This implies greater consumption of natural resources.


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